PDO Culatello Tours Zibello

Parma food Tours, Parmigiano parmesan cheese tour, Parma Ham tour, FWT Parm, Balsamico Tours Guide Angelo

 

HISTORY

When it comes to tradition, we cannot fail to mention the art of making Culatello. It is said that back in 1332, during the wedding banquet of Andrea Conti Rossi and Giovanna dei Conti Sanvitale, Culatello samplings were carried out. It is also said that the some Culatello had been brought to the bride and the groom as a gift and that later on the Pallavicino’s offered some Culatello to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.

The first explicit and official quotation about Culatello dates back to 1735 and it is found in a document kept in Parma. The first literary references date back to the nineteenth century, by the local poet Giuseppe Callegari and the sculptor Renato Brozzi, who would exchange views on Culatello with the famous poet Gabriele D’Annunzio.

PDO Culatello Tours Zibello

CHARACTERISTICS

PDO Culatello Tours Zibello
Culatello di Zibello is a type of cold meat made from the posterior muscles and inner thigh of the pig, properly cleaned on the surface and trimmed to obtain the classic pear shape. To put it in simple words, Culatello consists of muscle bundles from the thigh, which is the best part of the ham. Its curing must be carried out in well-ventilated areas at a temperature between 13° and 17° C for no longer than 10 months as of the salting phase. During this period ventilation, natural light exposure and moisture are allowed depending on the climatic factors in the production area.

PRODUCTION AREA
The area where the Culatello Zibello is produced includes the following municipalities in the province of Parma: Polesine, Busseto, Zibello, Soragna, Roccabianca, San Secondo, Sissa and Colorno.

FOLLOW THE TASTE!
Come to taste it at November Porc, a travelling gastronomic Festival, every weekend of November.

CONTACT US

PDO Culatello Tours Zibello

Villino di Porporano – the affordable Luxury Cool B&B country house, Parma

Villino

Villino di Porporano – the affordable Luxury B&B country house, Parma

When I first arrived at Villino to collect my clients for our Parma food tour, I was amazed how near it was to town … 8 minutes by car and here I was surrounded by countryside and the aroma of fresh coffee.

Elena arrived at the elegant gates of this wonderful country home.. greeted not only by her immediacy but by two pooches who immediately gave my shins a delightful massage!

”Come in Nick … want a coffee?”

Truth be known I’d just grabbed one but seeing the beautifully poured cappuccini on the cotton clad 17th century walnut table in the dining room I opted for another without a moment’s hesitation… that’s two in the space of half an hour!  God help my tourists!

Then followed the most delicious home baked brioche I had ever tasted and I felt completely at home…

”Where are you from Elena?”

”Near Abbruzzo in the centre but my husband is from Parma… I have just finished renovations here…”

”It looks fantastic… I love the style mix…”

Elena responded with a modesty so typical of Italians who really have a wealth of talent… yet decline such flattery.

The place is gorgeous and opens out in many directions into the garden, patios and into the beautiful dining area with rooms a generous extension of this masterclass of comfort casa interior design.

Coming from an interiors background I was and still am impressed.

 

flowers of the fwt tours Parma food
Villino is the perfect retreat from the charming but zestful Parma whirl and makes a perfect romance or relaxation location with now a new pool – a big tick now for all the boxes.

But what really makes this place special is Elena and her family and in a city where to be honest genuine accommodation is not surprisingly a plenty the Villino is one of a hand full of places we regularly recommend to our clients.

cooking-classes

That aside the food and trimmings are a dream – just look at their Tripadviosr reviews!

Welcome to Parma… it’s a given.

Tortellini pasta FWT food n cook day tours Parma1

TRIPADVISOR EXTRACT for Villino

91 reviews

avatar069
dianne40
Sterling, Virginia
Reviewer

4 reviews 4 reviews

Reviews in 4 cities Reviews in 4 cities
5 of 5 starsReviewed 26 August 2012 NEW

My husband and I had a wonderful experience staying at this B&B. I think what I liked best was the beautiful grounds, Elena and her family, Paula, her assistant, the pool and the fantastic breakfast. Elena makes you feel like family. I was very sad to leave because she made our stay so nice. I loved the location, just outside…More 

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ginaminasnooks
ginaminasnooks
darkest somerset
Contributor

17 reviews 17 reviews

Reviews in 9 cities Reviews in 9 cities
9 helpful votes 9 helpful votes
4 of 5 starsReviewed 17 August 2012

This B&B exudes sophistication and effortless charm. The fabric of the building and the rooms is very good, soft brick and linen. Airy public spaces comprise the large salon and loggia for breakfast. This meal was beautiful – with Parma ham (!) and feather light home made cakes, copious fresh orange juice, etc. Also, enjoy the fresh pool! The town…More 

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pncostello
pncostello
West Chester, Pennsylvania
Contributor

11 reviews 11 reviews

Reviews in 7 cities Reviews in 7 cities
4 helpful votes 4 helpful votes
5 of 5 starsReviewed 29 July 2012

This B&B is in a separate villa building next to the owner’s home. The inside of the building has been completely renovated and the rooms fully decorated. The bathroom is modern and fully equipped. It is all beautiful. Elena the owner is a gracious hostess and a wonderful baker. Her homemade pastry for the breakfast is excellent. Sitting on the…More 

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Margaret T
Sydney, Australia
1 review
5 of 5 starsReviewed 26 July 2012

I cannot talk highly enough about our stay. My family stayed for 6 magical nights during our recent trip to Europe and I am so glad we decided to stop in Parma and in particular with Elena and Guiseppe at Villino di Porporana. The rooms were of outstanding quality and we loved the way the beautifual building was restored. Paula…

Article Nick Garrett, FWT host and director of tours

Tel. +39 0521 64 22 68
Fax. +39 0521 641083
Mobile. +39 349 41 26 037
E-mail: info@villinodiporporano.com Photos by Davide Gallico, Paolo Pasini and Jacopo Niccoli

 

Parma Food Tours – choosing the best one… talking Quality and Ham tours

You have a choice

This is our No 1 Parma Ham tour destination…

… this one we know as the best. Parma Food Tours – choosing

Parma Ham tours - Parma Food Tours - choosing FWT  Bologna
Berkel ham slicer, Parma Ham tours - Parma Food Tours - choosing FWT  Bologna

Parma Ham tours - Parma Food Tours - choosing FWT  Bologna

On the inside all the facts and cultural history

FWT Parma Lunch spread

Tastings are offered and Lunch is the perfect place to relax and enjoy

The Best Parma Ham Tour is with FWT

3-kings-tours-FWT

The 3 Kings Tours of FWT Parma


Great Food Food Wine Tours of Parma

Our Lunch menu is second to none


Bookings

FWT always give you only the very best… 

Contact us for further tour details. Parma Food Tours – choosing

Magical Country Food strolling – The Parma Hills, Italy

More fwt 
 
FWT Walks Mt Gatto
 
Looking for a natural high!!?? Our tour below starts off at double the height of the Shard London!

Walking days … in the lap

hillside walks   Bergotto range 640m ABSL – Our start point

Our days in the Porcini and Truffle hills and mountains are absolutely delightful… amidst nature, 11th century hamlets and of course great food tasting treats abound!


PARMA HILLSIDE WALKS

Country strolls with lunch and picnic snack stop offs – 5 hrs

1-3 hr walks
Lunch
Stroll

Porcini from hills Food n walk tours Parma

We will collect you from Berceto rail station and whisk you into the ancient pilgrims hillside pathways… It is incredible… and sits in the heart of Cisa Porcini DPO consortzio.

The walks start with the ritual of collecting fresh mountain water from the ancient spring.  The taste is wonderful.  From there we stroll alongside the river and take the track up through the aromatic pine forests… the lungs say a huge thank you at this point!

Above the ancient Porcini village

the spring water collection

Walking for 20 minutes we reach the levelling out within the cool canopy of pines – we settle next to a 16th century ruin and get into a refreshing snack with a locally made picnic setting including benches and tables.

From here we can rummage around looking for the fantastic Porcini mushrooms.

Porcini risotto... delicious beyond-

Lunch has a fabulous rustic option or two!!

We can visit a superb famous Porcini restaurant Manubiola in the next village or opt for a roasted pizza at the superb Bar Jasoni at the  foot of the hill.

… the food like everything else here, is absolutely out of this world.

picking wild strawberries on the trail

On weekends the regional art gallery is open (just 25m from the pizzeria) with a fascinating artist on display – the perfect after-lunch relaxer.

The village is surrounded by superb walks and pathways so enjoy yourselves and take to the hills.


Above the vineyard on stroll...-food n walk

An after lunch stroll and breath of freshest air!———————-

Porcini hills Food n walk tours Parma


San Bernardo Mine trek

The walk tracks uphill for 1.5 hrs to a simply divine waterfall and rock pool summit.

Stop offs and views across to Tuscany.
Spring water tasting and collection, fresh from the mountain
Hillside trek
Picnic
return Lunch
Gallery visit (weekends)

1-4 people 115.00
4.8 people 160.00

LUNCH OPTION AS IN 3 KINGS TOUR


Porcini Trek and smugglers trail


Spring water tasting

Hillside trek and hunt
Picnic Lunch
Gallery visit (weekends)

1-4 people 180.00
4.8 people 280.00

Light or Full lunch as above

All prices are in Euros.
Deposit of 18.00 euros paid at time of booking

 


click here to enter the FWT 3 Kings tours of the Parma Italian foodie world… enter!


 

FWT  Tour Pricing

 


 

What Are Food Prices in Italy? Food n Wine Tours 2018

 

What Are Food Prices in Italy?

by Gabi Logan, Demand Media

Dinner for two in a nice restaurant with a bottle or liter of wine averages $50.
Dinner for two in a nice restaurant with a bottle or liter of wine averages 28.00 euros.Not bad for the best food in the world!

Italy is home to a wide variety of fresh foods — pasta, sausage, figs and sun-dried tomatoes — that tourists travel across oceans to experience. Upon arriving in Italy, travelers are either delighted to learn that they can enjoy delicious food at low prices or disappointed with mediocre food at high prices. Food prices in Italy depend on where you dine or shop, but if you eat like a local, you will spend less than you do at home.

Eating Out

An individual on a budget can dine in Italy for around a day, even eating out for every meal.

The typical Italian breakfast — caffe and pastry — costs $2.50 throughout the country. A take-out lunch, such as a calzone, sandwich or two pieces of pizza, runs from $3 to $6, as long as you avoid the tourist strip. In local trattorias, a hearty and substantial portion of pasta for dinner costs $10 to $15, as does a fixed-priced lunch with a first course — pasta, risotto or soup, main course, dessert and wine.

Continue reading “What Are Food Prices in Italy? Food n Wine Tours 2018”

Secret of Emilia-Romagna

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The Fecund Secret of Emilia-Romagna

Ferrara, Italy|Italy: treasure: Il Ristorantino di Colomba serves Ferrara's traditional cappellacci di zucca, handmade pasta stuffed with
Local treasure: Il Ristorantino di Colomba serves Ferrara’s traditional cappellacci di zucca, handmade pasta stuffed with squash.
MORE ON EMILIA-ROMAGNA
FWT.com’s Insider Guide:

It’s Italy’s unsung region, yet its food has conquered the world—or at least the table. Think prosciutto di Parma, Parmesan, porcini, and half of all pastas known to man (just for starters). The source of its power? Po Valley dirt—fine, dense, almost chocolately , accumulated over millennia. Patrick Symmes feasts on the cities of the plain

The soil in the Arda Valley was, in the first days of September, already furrowed for a second crop. Everywhere we looked, right beside the roaring A1 or at some forgotten crossroads amid collapsing farmhouses, machines had plucked the harvest and turned the ground. Emilia-Romagna, the flat northern heartland of Italian farming, was combed into neat rows. Everywhere we paused, we stared in disbelief. Finally, outside the supermarket in Lugagnano Val d’Arda, I stepped in among the clods.

If you’ve ever gardened, you know the feeling I had. The dirt—millions of years of silt, washed down from the Alps and Apennines and deposited into this great bowl by the flooding of the Po River—lay meters deep. It is a rich brown humus, fine, dense, almost chocolaty. This stuff—mere dirt—is the building block of the wealth, strife, and food of the Po Valley, the great plain at the heart of Italian agriculture.

The story of Emilia-Romagna is the story of that soil, which grows the grass that feeds the cows that flavor the milk that makes the Parmesan cheese taste so good just down the road in Parma. This is the soil that sprouts the corn and wheat that fatten the pigs that become the ham that becomes prosciutto di Parma. This is the brown muck, fantastically productive, that grows the Trebbiano grapes, cooked down into the aged vinegar balsamico di Modena, in the town of that name, just another half hour along the A1. And beyond that, right down the curve of the immense plain—the largest flat place in Italy—all the products of this soil have been gathered into Bologna, one of Italy’s great, innovative trading cities, whose nimble-minded gourmets invented much of what passes for Italian food around the globe. Ravioli? Tagliatelle? Lasagna? Polenta? Tortellini? Half of all pasta shapes? All from Emilia-Romagna. If your mouth is not watering, stop reading here.

The soil next to the supermarket in Lugagnano wasn’t just brown and rich: It was practically alive, a tightly packed silt that the machines had turned up into chunks the size of dinner plates. I prodded one with my foot. “The size of dinner plates,” I said to my wife, awed.

“Bigger,” she corrected. Some of the pieces were the size of serving platters.

If you want to know how Emilia-Romagna has conquered the world, one table at a time, you need only look down.

We had rented a stone house in Castelletto, an obscure village high up in the Arda Valley. It proved to be a steep hamlet of stone houses, many empty, and about forty year-round residents, mostly old women. Ours was the only rental property in Castelletto, found online. It had good views, modern everything, and it rattled in the fierce mountain winds.

Our son, Max—a precious bundle, aged fourteen months—attempted his first steps in Castelletto’s empty playground. We took our first steps too: awkward greetings in Italian, and a quick scamper to the valley’s most famous site, the fortress town of Castell’Arquato. I struggled up the medieval keep with Max on my back, and we surveyed the views up the Arda—an ugly dam, and then the gentle Apennines, sharing a border with Tuscany. In the other direction was the great flat plain of the Po River.

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Fr more info email me at info@foodnwalktours.com

 

Nick Garrett