Delicious Delicious Delicious Italy!! – welcome to Food n Wine tours Balsamico, Parmesan and Parma Ham tours

TRULY THE MOST BEAUTIFUL Parma tour – with Food n Walk Tour bookings manager Nick

Angelo and Nick serve up a great day in the Food Valley

Welcome to real Italy … 

 

Angelo, Parma’s much mooted tour guide will ease you around this beautiful Italian gourmet food tour.

Food n Walk Tours Parma consist of superior quality self drive guided visits, to the production sites of some of Italy’s most famous DOP food products such as Prosciutto di Parma Ham, Parmigiano Reggiano cheese as well as breathtaking strolls through Traditional Balsamic Vinegar studios of Reggio and Modena.

 

THE BEST PARMIGIANO REGGIANO CHEESE TOUR

Parma FWT Parmigiano Reggiano cheese factory visit. Visiting a “Caseificio” is like going back in time. The “King of the cheeses” actually has very old origins and today, like 7 centuries ago, Parmigiano Reggiano cheese is still made following the same traditional and genuine methods. Parmigiano Reggiano cheese is protected by the European Union and can only be produced in a restricted area, the so called “zona tipica”, which includes the provinces of Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, and a part of Bologna (left of the Reno river) and Mantova (right of the Po river). It takes about 2 hours to see the whole production, preferably early in the morning.
 
 
parma ham parma golosa
 

 


3 Kings Tour: A Breathtaking tour, Food n Wine Parma Food Tour Prices

Parma food Tours, Parmigiano parmesan cheese tour, Parma Ham tour, FWT Parm, Balsamico Tours Guide Angelo

ciao tutti!


 

THIS REALLY IS THE PERFECT PARMA FOOD TOUR!

3 Kings Tour

The Castle, the Palace, the Valleys, our Makers

Our most popular Parmigiano-Reggiano Parma Ham and Balsamico Tour with Angelo Fanzini.

 

All DPO products – Classic locations – beauty spots – Castle and Vineyards strolls – Photo calls and lots of treats


 


 Yay! You’ve found it – The best quality food tour in Parma nay Italy – Food n Wine tours… 

… just compare our destinations.

Parma Golosa take you Inside the Balsamico world

3 Kings Food n Wine Tour, Parma

 


 

Now you can decide on a Parma FWTour based on a really full selection of material and information.

 


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Thanks for your enquiry and talk soon! Nick

 

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Welcome fwt Parma.

Secret of Emilia-Romagna

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The Fecund Secret of Emilia-Romagna

Ferrara, Italy|Italy: treasure: Il Ristorantino di Colomba serves Ferrara's traditional cappellacci di zucca, handmade pasta stuffed with
Local treasure: Il Ristorantino di Colomba serves Ferrara’s traditional cappellacci di zucca, handmade pasta stuffed with squash.
MORE ON EMILIA-ROMAGNA
FWT.com’s Insider Guide:

It’s Italy’s unsung region, yet its food has conquered the world—or at least the table. Think prosciutto di Parma, Parmesan, porcini, and half of all pastas known to man (just for starters). The source of its power? Po Valley dirt—fine, dense, almost chocolately , accumulated over millennia. Patrick Symmes feasts on the cities of the plain

The soil in the Arda Valley was, in the first days of September, already furrowed for a second crop. Everywhere we looked, right beside the roaring A1 or at some forgotten crossroads amid collapsing farmhouses, machines had plucked the harvest and turned the ground. Emilia-Romagna, the flat northern heartland of Italian farming, was combed into neat rows. Everywhere we paused, we stared in disbelief. Finally, outside the supermarket in Lugagnano Val d’Arda, I stepped in among the clods.

If you’ve ever gardened, you know the feeling I had. The dirt—millions of years of silt, washed down from the Alps and Apennines and deposited into this great bowl by the flooding of the Po River—lay meters deep. It is a rich brown humus, fine, dense, almost chocolaty. This stuff—mere dirt—is the building block of the wealth, strife, and food of the Po Valley, the great plain at the heart of Italian agriculture.

The story of Emilia-Romagna is the story of that soil, which grows the grass that feeds the cows that flavor the milk that makes the Parmesan cheese taste so good just down the road in Parma. This is the soil that sprouts the corn and wheat that fatten the pigs that become the ham that becomes prosciutto di Parma. This is the brown muck, fantastically productive, that grows the Trebbiano grapes, cooked down into the aged vinegar balsamico di Modena, in the town of that name, just another half hour along the A1. And beyond that, right down the curve of the immense plain—the largest flat place in Italy—all the products of this soil have been gathered into Bologna, one of Italy’s great, innovative trading cities, whose nimble-minded gourmets invented much of what passes for Italian food around the globe. Ravioli? Tagliatelle? Lasagna? Polenta? Tortellini? Half of all pasta shapes? All from Emilia-Romagna. If your mouth is not watering, stop reading here.

The soil next to the supermarket in Lugagnano wasn’t just brown and rich: It was practically alive, a tightly packed silt that the machines had turned up into chunks the size of dinner plates. I prodded one with my foot. “The size of dinner plates,” I said to my wife, awed.

“Bigger,” she corrected. Some of the pieces were the size of serving platters.

If you want to know how Emilia-Romagna has conquered the world, one table at a time, you need only look down.

We had rented a stone house in Castelletto, an obscure village high up in the Arda Valley. It proved to be a steep hamlet of stone houses, many empty, and about forty year-round residents, mostly old women. Ours was the only rental property in Castelletto, found online. It had good views, modern everything, and it rattled in the fierce mountain winds.

Our son, Max—a precious bundle, aged fourteen months—attempted his first steps in Castelletto’s empty playground. We took our first steps too: awkward greetings in Italian, and a quick scamper to the valley’s most famous site, the fortress town of Castell’Arquato. I struggled up the medieval keep with Max on my back, and we surveyed the views up the Arda—an ugly dam, and then the gentle Apennines, sharing a border with Tuscany. In the other direction was the great flat plain of the Po River.

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Fr more info email me at info@foodnwalktours.com

 

Nick Garrett